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I used to think git submodules were categorically evil. This was naive, as most choices in software development are about tradeoffs. A part of the reason I had this simplistic view was because of an article called “Why your Company Shouldn’t use Git Submodules.” I took a second look at this article recently and I read the docs on git submodules. What follows are some more nuanced thoughts on how and when git submodules can be used effectively.

What are Submodules even for?

The docs actually provide a very helpful example to answer this question:

Suppose you’re developing a web site and creating Atom feeds. Instead of writing your own Atom-generating code, you decide to use a library. You’re likely to have to either include this code from a shared library like a CPAN install or Ruby gem, or copy the source code into your own project tree. The issue with including the library is that it’s difficult to customize the library in any way and often more difficult to deploy it, because you need to make sure every client has that library available. The issue with vendoring the code into your own project is that any custom changes you make are difficult to merge when upstream changes become available.

Interestingly, this is very different from what we might call the “naive perceived purpose” of git submodules, which is well captured by the opening paragraph of the aforementioned article arguing against git submodules:

It is not uncommon at all when working on any kind of larger-scale project with Git to find yourself wanting to share code between multiple different repositories – whether it be some core system among multiple different products built on top of that system, or perhaps a shared utility library between projects.

At first glance, Git submodules seem to be the perfect answer for this

I used to think submodules were designed for the purpose of sharing code. As the above example from the docs suggest, that’s not entirely true. Its more accurate to say that git submodules are useful when you want to share code that you also need change along with the consumer of that code. If you’re not trying to change the shared code along with the consumer of that code, there are better options for sharing your code. The docs even seem to admit this:

It’s quite likely that if you’re using submodules, you’re doing so because you really want to work on the code in the submodule at the same time as you’re working on the code in the main project (or across several submodules). Otherwise you would probably instead be using a simpler dependency management system (such as Maven or Rubygems).

So, if you’re using git submodules merely as a way of sharing code, that’s probably misguided, as it’s a use case that git submodules weren’t designed to handle. There’s additional complexity that comes along with using git submodules, and this complexity isn’t worth it if there are simpler ways of sharing code. This additional complexity may be worth it if you’re trying to work on shared code and project code simultaneously and if there are methods of managing this complexity in a way that a) keeps us moving quickly and b) helps us avoids costly mistakes. The next section is about some of the complexities of git submodules and the techniques the git folks recommend for managing these complexities.

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Resolved: Civil disobedience in a democracy is morally justified.

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2018-2019

Resolved: The United States federal government should substantially reduce its restrictions on legal immigration to the United States.

2017-2018

Resolved: The United States federal government should substantially increase its funding and/or regulation of elementary and/or secondary education in the United States.

2016-2017

Resolved: The United States federal government should substantially increase its economic and/or diplomatic engagement with the People’s Republic of China.

2015-2016

Resolved: The United States federal government should substantially curtail its domestic surveillance.

2014-2015

Resolved: The United States federal government should substantially increase its non-military exploration and/or development of the Earth’s oceans.

2013-2014

Resolved: The United States federal government should substantially increase its economic engagement toward Cuba, Mexico or Venezuela.

2012-2013

Resolved: The United States federal government should substantially increase its transportation infrastructure investment in the United States.

2011-2012

Resolved: The United States federal government should substantially increase its exploration and/or development of space beyond the Earth’s mesosphere.

2010-2011

Resolved: The United States federal government should substantially reduce its military and/or police presence in one or more of the following: South Korea, Japan, Afghanistan, Kuwait, Iraq, Turkey.

2009-2010

Resolved: The United States federal government should substantially increase social services for persons living in poverty in the United States.

2008-2009

Resolved: The United States federal government should substantially increase alternative energy incentives in the United States.

2007-2008

Resolved: The United States federal government should substantially increase its public health assistance to Sub-Saharan Africa.

2006-2007

Resolved: The United States federal government should establish a policy substantially increasing the number of persons serving in one or more of the following national service programs: AmeriCorps, Citizen Corps, Senior Corps, Peace Corps, Learn and Serve America, Armed Forces.

2005-2006

Resolved: The United States federal government should substantially decrease its authority either to detain without charge or to search without probable cause.

2004-2005

Resolved: That the United States federal government should establish a foreign policy substantially increasing its support of United Nations peacekeeping operations.

2003-2004

Resolved: That the United States federal government should establish an ocean policy substantially increasing protection of marine natural resources.

2002-2003

Resolved: That the United States federal government should substantially increase public health services for mental health care in the United States.

2001-2002

Resolved: That the United States federal government should establish a foreign policy significantly limiting the use of weapons of mass destruction.

2000-2001

Resolved: That the United States federal government should significantly increase protection of privacy in the United States in one or more of the following areas: employment, medical records, consumer information, search and seizure.

1999-2000

Resolved: That the federal government should establish an education policy to significantly increase academic achievement in secondary schools in the United States.

1998-1999

Resolved: That the United States should substantially change its foreign policy toward Russia.

1997-1998

Resolved: That the federal government should establish a policy to substantially increase renewable energy use in the United States.

1996-1997

Resolved: That the federal government should establish a program to substantially reduce juvenile crime in the United States.

1995-1996

Resolved: That the United States government should substantially change its foreign policy toward the People’s Republic of China.

1994-1995

Resolved: That the United States government should substantially strengthen regulation of immigration to the United States.

1993-1994

Resolved: That the federal government should guarantee comprehensive national health insurance to all United States citizens.

1992-1993

Resolved: That the United States government should reduce worldwide pollution through its trade and/or aid policies.

1991-1992

Resolved: That the federal government should significantly increase social services to homeless individuals in the United States.

1990-1991

Resolved: that the United States Government should significantly increase space exploration beyond Earth’s mesosphere.

1989-1990

Resolved: That the federal government should adopt a nationwide policy to decrease overcrowding in prisons and jails in the United States.

1988-1989

Resolved: That the federal government should implement a comprehensive program to guarantee retirement security for United States citizens over age 65.

1987-1988

Resolved: That the United States government should adopt a policy to increase political stability in Latin America.

1986-1987

Resolved: That the federal government should implement a comprehensive long-term agricultural policy in the United States.

1985-1986

Resolved: That the federal government should establish a comprehensive national policy to protect the quality of water in the United States.

1984-1985

Resolved: That the federal government should provide employment for all employable U.S. Citizens living in poverty.

1983-1984

Resolved: That the United States should establish uniform rules governing the procedure of all criminal courts in the nation.

1982-1983

Resolved: That the United States should significantly curtail its arms sales to other countries.

1981-1982

Resolved: That the federal government should establish minimum educational standards for elementary and secondary schools in the United States.

1980-1981

Resolved: That the federal government should initiate and enforce safety guarantees on consumer goods.

1979-1980

Resolved: That the United States should significantly change its foreign trade policies.

1978-1979

Resolved: That the federal government should establish a comprehensive program to significantly increase the energy independence of the U.S.

1977-1978

Resolved: That the federal government should establish a comprehensive program to regulate the health care in the United States.

1976-1977

Resolved: That a comprehensive program of penal reform should be adopted throughout the United States.

1975-1976

Resolved: That the development and allocation of scarce world resources should be controlled by an international organization.

1974-1975

Resolved: That the United States should significantly change the method of selection of presidential and vice-presidential candidates.

1973-1974

Resolved: That the federal government should guarantee a minimum annual income to each family unit.

1972-1973

Resolved: That governmental financial support for all public and secondary education in the United States be provided exclusively by the federal government.

1971-1972

Resolved: That the jury system in the United States should be significantly changed.

1970-1971

Resolved: That the federal government should establish, finance, and administer programs to control air and/or water pollution in the United States.

1969-1970

Resolved: That Congress should prohibit unilateral United States military intervention in foreign countries.

1968-1969

Resolved: That the United States should establish a system of compulsory service by all citizens.

1967-1968

Resolved: That Congress should establish uniform regulations to control criminal investigation procedures.

1966-1967

Resolved: That the foreign aid program of the United States should be limited to non-military assistance.

1965-1966

Resolved: That the federal government should adopt a program of compulsory arbitration in labor-management disputes in basic industries.

1964-1965

Resolved: That nuclear weapons should be controlled by an international organization.

1963-1964

Resolved: That Social Security benefits should be extended to include complete medical care.

1962-1963

Resolved: That the United States should promote a Common Market for the western hemisphere.

1961-1962

Resolved: That the federal government should equalize educational opportunity by means of grants to the states for public elementary and secondary education.

1960-1961

Resolved: That the United Nations should be significantly strengthened.

1959-1960

Resolved: That the federal government should substantially increase its regulation of labor unions.

1958-1959

Resolved: That the United States should adopt the essential feature of the British system of education.

1957-1958

Resolved: That the United States foreign aid should be substantially increased.

1956-1957

Resolved: That the federal government should sustain the prices of major agricultural products at not less than 90% of parity.

1955-1956

Resolved: That the government subsidies should be granted according to need to high school graduates who qualify for additional training.

1954-1955

Resolved: That the federal government should initiate a policy of free trade among nations friendly to the United States.

1953-1954

Resolved: That the President of the United States should be elected by the direct vote of the people.

1952-1953

Resolved: That the Atlantic pact nations should form a federal union.

1951-1952

Resolved: That all American citizens should be subject to conscription for essential service in time of war.

1950-1951

Resolved: That the American people should reject the Welfare state.

1949-1950

Resolved: That the President of the United States should be elected by the direct vote of the people.

1948-1949

Resolved: That a federal world government should be established.

1947-1948

Resolved: That the federal government should require arbitration of labor disputes in all basic industries.

1946-1947

Resolved: That the federal government should provide a system of complete Medical care available to all citizens at public expense.

1945-1946

Resolved: That ever able-bodied male citizen of the United States should have one year of full time military training before attaining age 24.

1944-1945

Resolved: That the legal voting age should be reduced to eighteen years.

1943-1944

Resolved: That the United States should join in reconstituting the League of Nations.

1942-1943

Resolved: That a federal world government should be established.

1941-1942

Resolved: That every able-bodied male citizen in the United States should be required to have one year of full-time military training before attaining the present draft age.

1940-1941

Resolved: That the power of the federal government should be increased.

1939-1940

Resolved: That the federal government should own and operate the railroads.

1938-1939

Resolved: That the United States should establish an alliance with Great Britain.

1937-1938

Resolved: That the several states should adopt a unicameral system of legislation.

1936-1937

Resolved: That all electric utilities should be governmentally owned and operated.

1935-1936

Resolved: That the several states should enact legislation providing for a system of complete medical service available to all citizens at public expense.

1934-1935

Resolved: That the federal government should adopt the policy of equalizing educational opportunity throughout the nation by means of annual grants to the several states for public elementary and secondary education.

1933-1934

Resolved: That the United States should adopt the essential features of the British system of radio control and operation.

1932-1933

Resolved: That at least one half of all state and local revenues should be derived from sources other than tangible property.

1931-1932

Resolved: That the several states should enact legislation providing for compulsory unemployment insurance.

1930-1931

Resolved: That chain stores are detrimental to the best interests of the American public.

1929-1930

Resolved: That installment buying of personal property as now practiced in the United States is both socially and economically desirable.

1928-1929

Resolved: That the English cabinet method of legislation is more efficient than the committee system is in the United States.

1927-1928

Resolved: That a federal department of education should be created with a secretary in the president’s cabinet.

2015-2016

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November 2015

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October 2015

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Topic Release Schedule

From August 1 through September 11, chapter advisors and member students may vote online for a new slate of LD topics chosen by the LD Wording Committee at its summer meeting. The September/October LD topic (voted on the previous fall) is announced August 8.

If you would like to submit an LD resolution for consideration, please submit by June 1 for the following school year.

In addition, we have established a separate LD resolution for the first two months of the novice season. Coaches are encouraged to check with tournament hosts in their area before exclusively prepping for one topic over another.

The PF Wording Committee chooses a number of debate topics at its summer meeting. These areas are then used throughout the school year. During the last week of the month (or seven days prior to the topic release date), chapter advisors and member students may vote for one resolution to be used as the next PF topic.

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